MortgageReal Estate

America’s homebuyers are saving big as interest rates continue to decline

Last week, 53.5% of borrowers received rates under 4.25%

Mortgage borrowers who shopped around last week could’ve saved $42,137 over the life of a $300,000 loan, according to LendingTree's Mortgage Rate Competition Index.

The index measures the spread in the APR of the best offers available on its website. LendingTree derives that savings claim by comparing the amount a borrower would pay out of over the life of a loan at the lowest available interest rate on its site versus the highest available interest rate.

LendingTree indicates that the share of borrowers who received rates under 4.25% rose to 53.5%, with the index retreating 0.89 for the week ending June 9, 2019. 

This percentage is moderately up from last week’s 42.3%, and surpasses 2018’s rate when no purchase offers were under 4.25%.

Notably, the report also highlights that across all 30-year, fixed-rate purchase mortgage applications made on LendingTree’s website, 17.4% of borrowers were offered an interest rate of 4%, making it the most common interest rate.

When it came to 30-year fixed-rate refinance borrowers, 65.6% received offers under 4.25%, climbing from 52% one week prior. Unsurprisingly, this rate is still up from 2018’s rate when only 0.01% of refinance offers were under 4.25%.

This means with a wider refinance market index of 1.11, the typical refinance borrower could have saved $52,754 by shopping around for the lowest rate.

According to the report, across all 30-year, fixed-rate refinance applications, the most common interest rate was 3.875%. This rate was offered to 19.8% of borrowers.

This image highlights the distribution of last week's interest rates:

 (Click to enlarge; Source: LendingTree)

LendingTree: Mortgage Competition Index

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