According to a recent blog from REthink, Millennials focus heavily on social media, especially when it comes to real estate.

The blog, called "an open letter from Millennials to the real estate industry" said:

Buying a home is terrifying. Its the biggest purchase I’ve even considered making so far in my life and I don’t want to screw it up. I do want a real estate agent to help me through this complex process and to make sure I don’t get ripped off. But just like the rest of the products and services I use, I expect transparency and flexibility on a level that might make you a little uncomfortable. My generation thrives on making the most of every second of the day. I don’t just stand to wait in line, I check sports scores, catch up with friends, and stay up on the news.

Here are 4 suggestions from the blog onfor how real estate professionals can better connect with Millennials.

1. Digitize as much paperwork as possible.

While it’s understandable that it’s hard closing a new home over the phone, Millennials recommend using technological avenues such as Dropbox or Google Drive to provide all the necessary documents that makes life easier for everyone.

2. Don’t just send me a bunch of bare bones listings.

Pictures are everything, and it’s important for Millennials if realtors to send them a lot of detailed pictures and even by taking virtual tours than visiting a home more than once every weekend for the entire time they are interested in the home.

3. Be the expert

While some do know a bit on how the housing market works, Millennials expect for a bit of guidance. Millennials would even welcome realtors to put together a step by step infographic that walks them through the process of purchasing a home. Provide information they can’t google online and even have a list of frequent questions first-time homebuyers ask.  

4. Get Creative

Although they are conscious that everything costs money, Millennials want creativity. While some suggest purchasing a drone that shows them a short bird’s eye view video of the whole neighborhood, but they also suggest using tools like AirBnB or Home Away to get homebuyers to “test drive” a home.