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Opinion, commentary, and analysis on everything that makes the U.S. housing economy tick -- not to mention the ghosts in the machine, too. Written by HW's team of editors and reporters each business day.

Want to disrupt the mortgage industry? Ask the decision makers

Here's who will drive this disruption
Throughout Digital Risk's recent "Break the Glass" Executive Women’s Sonoma Summit, attendees brainstormed how and why disruption in the mortgage industry should be spearheaded by one of the most influential, highly educated and fiscally responsible consumer groups – women. Who would better understand the differences, needs and wants of the major purchase decision makers than women?
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Monday Morning Cup of Coffee: How did alleged serial killer get his real estate license?

Election Day is right around the corner!
The story is still developing on alleged serial killer Todd Kohlhepp, 45 and a registered sex offender living in South Carolina. But there is one key fact about Kohlhepp that is leaving those following the story shocked: How did Todd Kohlhepp get a real estate license? Here’s a brief recap on the developing story.
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Fannie Mae CEO reveals "next frontier" of mortgage lending

Here is the next big idea
The recent launches of initiatives such as the Day 1 Certainty program, the student loan venture with SoFi and progress with affordable lending under the HomeReady program underpin Fannie Mae's dedication to increase mortgage lending. Even so, you’d be hard pressed to guess the next big thing in lending. And now you don’t have to.
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Here's a status update on Freddie's 3% down mortgage program

Where are 97% LTV products headed?
Freddie Mac is adamant about not sharing details on the success of its Home Possible Advantage Program, with no apparent plans to start revealing it. So, what is public knowledge about the program? Here's what Donald Layton, Freddie Mac CEO, said during the conference call.
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Five things we learned from the 2016 home-buying season

And what it all means for 2017
[EXPERT COMMENTARY] With vacations over and the holidays coming fast, home buying is beginning to slow down. So, given all of the predictions for 2016, let’s review the better part of the 2016 home-buying season and see what we’ve learned, with an eye toward 2017.
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Monday Morning Cup of Coffee: Prospects of a Trump presidency, and the good news in Detroit

Also, the scariest part of the OCC security breach
There are still about 30,000 vacant houses and buildings in Detroit as a result of manufacturing job loss and the foreclosure crisis. But a program funded by unions to renovate vacant houses in Detroit has been so successful that it's now being expanded to eight more Rustbelt cities, the AP reported on Sunday. All this and more in MMCC!
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Campaign pain: What does this election season mean for mortgage finance?

"From caucus to raucous"
It seems like we've gone from caucus to raucous this election year.  Anyone not bombarded by the rancor is probably hiding under a rock. The rest of us, however, are left wondering not only who will occupy the White House next, but what we're in for. For mortgage and real estate professionals, there's some interesting solace to be found in historical economic data.
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Here are 5 big insights from the new HMDA data

The state of the mortgage and housing market for 2015
The release of the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data for 2015 at the end of September gave an important status update on the mortgage origination market. Most notably, it showed the market continued to benefit from an improved housing market in 2015. Here are five takeaways from the new HMDA data set, according to one expert economist.
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Here's how to navigate the turbulent waters between CFPB regulation and bankruptcy code

Getting bankruptcy right
As each year goes by, lenders and servicers spend more of their budgets on compliance to avoid regulatory potential pitfalls. The perception that the cost of proper training and revising current procedures outweighs the cost of litigation related to default bankruptcy servicing. This isn't true. Instead, this is what you need to do.
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