Experts continue to question the impact of Hurricane Harvey on Houston’s housing market, and Urban Institute created graphs that showed five facts about the changing market.

During the Category 4 storm, the Houston metro was pounded with 9 trillion gallons of water, creating a hurdle for homeowners and renters across the city. Urban Institute explained the impact will be especially hard on low-income, minority families.

Here are three facts from the Urban Institute to keep in mind about the storm’s impact.

1. Homeownership took a hard hit

The chart below shows the areas of Houston with the highest homeownership rate also saw the most flooding. What’s more, only about 7% of households were insured in the Houston area and 70% of homeowners in the flooded area were uninsured, CoreLogic estimated.

Click to Enlarge

Harvey

(Source: Urban Institute)

2. Newer homeowners in danger of slipping into negative equity

Similar to the hurricane hitting the hardest in the areas with the highest homeownership rates, it also overwhelmed areas with the lowest equity, Urban Institute reported. Many homes could soon slip into negative equity as home values in the area drop.

Click to Enlarge

Harvey

(Source: Urban Institute)

3. Harvey hit all incomes, areas and property types

Urban Institute explained that while Hurricane Katrina affected mostly low-income communities, Hurricane Harvey swept through communities in every income bracket. This could mean a quicker recovery than in 2005 as higher income brackets will be able to build back more quickly.

Click to Enlarge

Harvey

(Source: Urban Institute)

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