Morale among the employees at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is falling and it’s falling fast, according to the CFPB’s annual employee survey, which was obtained by the Washington Times.

According to the Washington Times report, the CFPB has been “plagued with employee complaints this year, including the very public testimony of employees alleging managerial discrimination this spring and union disputes that led to the resignations of two of its five elected board members this summer.”

HousingWire has been covering the story of the alleged discrimination at the CFPB since March and will continue its coverage, and many of the revelations and accusations to date have been shocking to observers on both side of the political aisle.

The discrimination allegations were just one of many issues that CFPB employees cite as a reason for their waning confidence.

From the Washington Times report:

According to its annual employee survey — which hasn’t been released publicly but was distributed internally Oct. 30 — opinions have shifted significantly against the CFPB this year. In 41 out of the 75 questions asked, employees’ favorable opinions decreased or unfavorable opinions increased compared with last year.

CFPB officials say they are taking steps to try to reverse the decline in employee confidence and morale.

According to the Washington Times report, the bottom 10 most unfavorable survey results involved performance reviews, proper recognition from management, employee empowerment, the ability for an employee to climb the agency’s ladder into a better position, and satisfaction with senior leaders’ policies and practices.