What to expect at HousingWire’s Spring Summit

The focus of the Summit is The Year-Round Purchase Market. Record low rates led to a banner year for mortgage lenders in 2020, and this year is expected to be just as incredible.

Increasing lending and servicing capacity – regardless of rates

Business process outsourcing and digital transformation are proven solutions that more companies in the mortgage industry are turning to. Download this white paper for more.

HousingWire's 2021 Spring Summit

We’ve gathered four of the top housing economists to speak at our virtual summit, a new event designed for HW+ members that’s focused on The Year-Round Purchase Market.

An Honest Conversation on minority homeownership

In this episode, Lloyd interviews a senior research associate in the Housing Finance Policy Center at the Urban Institute about the history and data behind minority homeownership.

Politics & Money

Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac watchdog prepping for "massive IPO"

Fox News: FHFA interviewing Wall Street investment banks to handle the offering

The watchdog for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is interviewing Wall Street firms to handle a public offering of the shares of the nation’s two largest mortgage financiers that would dwarf any IPO in history, Fox News reports.

The Federal Housing Finance Agency has been interviewing “a handful” of Wall Street investment banks, Fox said, citing anonymous sources directly involved in the process.

“Winning the adviser appointment would be a coveted one – and potentially lucrative given the size of the offering, somewhere between $150 billion and $200 billion, government officials have told possible investment advisers,” the Fox article said.

In comparison, the largest IPO in history was Saudi Aramco, the Saudi Arabian government’s petroleum and natural gas company. It raised $25.6 billion on Dec. 5, beating Alibaba’s $25 billion IPO in 2014.

For the record, offering shares of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac technically wouldn’t be “initial public offerings,” because Fannie Mae began trading on the New York Stock Exchange in 1968, and Freddie Mac began trading on the same exchange in 1989.

The “offering” would be the 80% of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac held by the federal government since 2008.

The main reason for the shaky finances that prompted the takeovers were investments in private-label subprime mortgage bonds, containing loans that didn’t qualify to be backed by the two companies but were bought as a way to fulfill their Congressional mandate to invest in affordable housing.

Shares of the companies once traded above $68 and were considered as safe as U.S. Treasuries because of an implied government backing. They were kicked off the NYSE after their government takeovers and became penny stocks. In November 2008, you could have bought a share of Fannie Mae for 54 cents. Today, it would cost around $3.

Prior to Fannie Mae’s creation by Congress in 1938 as part of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “New Deal,” someone who wanted to buy a home had to pass the muster of local banks who knew they would be holding the mortgage, and the risk, for the life of the loan.

With Fannie Mae, bankers could make loans that met the conservative – but not ultra-conservative – standards set by the government and sell them to Fannie Mae to be packaged into mortgage bonds that were sold to private investors. That off-loading of risk created a liquid mortgage market that former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan and others would later call “the envy of the world.”

The collapse of the financial system in 2008 was caused by subprime mortgages that didn’t meet Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac standards. After subprime defaults caused a panic on Wall Street, which had reaped huge profits from pushing the risky private-label loans, the damage spread throughout the economy.

Loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac began defaulting later when massive job losses meant people with more conservative loans couldn’t pay their monthly bills and couldn’t sell their homes because the real estate market was in freefall.

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3d rendering of a row of luxury townhouses along a street

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