Adam Constantine on MLK Jr.’s impact on housing equality

During the interview, Constantine explains why the industry needs to focus on evoking intentional change rather than launching lackluster initiatives.

Managing Credit Risk in 2021 and Beyond

Join a panel of industry experts as they provide an economic outlook for 2021 and a discussion with regional bankers on how they are managing credit risk over the next several years.

Amid record-high origination volumes, mortgage fraud risk is down

CoreLogic's recently released Mortgage Fraud Report is the industry standard for nationwide fraud monitoring and analysis. Read the findings here.

Empowering women to be financially great with Dava Davin

Women of Influence winner Dava Davin joins Girlfunds to discuss everything from her best financial tip to her advice on starting the home-buying process.

InvestmentsMortgage

New York Times: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac being ‘held captive’

How involved was the white house in 2012 profit sweeps?

In light of the market crash in 2008, the government took over mortgage companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, promising to return the companies to the shareholders when they were able to stand on their own again, according to an article by Gretchen Morgenson for The New York Times.

As part of a lawsuit filed against the government, sealed documents were revealed that contains the truth about the White House’s involvement in the U.S. Treasury’s profit sweep of the companies in 2012, according to the article.

From the article:

The newly released documents go beyond previous disclosures in the case and make clear that the Obama administration never had any intention of restoring Fannie and Freddie, which enjoyed implicit backing from the government before the takeover, to their status as stand-alone entities.

An email from Jim Parrott, then a top White House official on housing finance, was sent the day the so-called profit sweep was announced. It said the change was structured to ensure that the companies couldn’t “repay their debt and escape as it were.”

The documents also show the Treasury moving to modify the terms of the mortgage finance giants’ $187.5 billion bailout shortly after a July 2012 meeting when the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Fannie’s and Freddie’s regulator, learned that they were about to enter “the golden years” of profitability.

Actually, in the years since the federal government modified its conservatorship agreement with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to sweep all the profits from the government-sponsored enterprises into the government’s coffers, many observers, including those with a serious financial interest, have questioned whether the so-called “Third Amendment sweep” was even necessary.

Read more about that here.

Back in July 2015, Judge Margaret Sweeney in the Federal Claims Court in Washington granted a motion that will force the U.S. Treasury to release all discovery document materials in its possession that pertain to the decision to take Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac into conservatorship.

Most Popular Articles

Prepare for the rise in mortgage rates

Economists offer their takes on how high mortgage rates will climb, how lenders will respond and what impact this will have on the housing market. HW+ Premium Content

Jan 18, 2021 By

Latest Articles

CFPB clarifies role of supervisory guidance

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued a final rule Tuesday clarifying that supervisory guidance is not backed by the same force as law or regulation.

Jan 19, 2021 By
3d rendering of a row of luxury townhouses along a street

Log In

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Please