Tuesday marks the next round of bank earnings, with Citigroup (C), Wells Fargo (WFC) and JPMorgan Chase (JPM) once again paving the way for the housing and financial markets.

The current estimate for Wells Fargo’s earnings is $1.02, with revenue expected to increase 3% year-over-year to $21.08 billion.

During the second quarter, Wells Fargo posted net income of $5.7 billion, or $1.01 earnings per share, including an increase in origination from $36 billion in the previous quarter to $47 billion.

JPMorgan Chase is predicted to hit $1.38 per share and revenue of $23.99 billion, a .5% increase from a year ago. This is compared to second-quarter net income of $6 billion and earnings per share at $1.46. Mortgage originations came in at $16.8 billion, down 66% from the prior year and 1% from the first quarter.

“Shares of JPM are attempting to hold the $58 level ahead of tomorrows results,” Briefing.com said in an earnings preview report for JPMorgan.

“Investors are clearly skittish holding equities ahead of tomorrow's news. JPM may be able to alleviate some of the concerns if it is able to provide a solid report, particularly improved loan growth, an upward trend in housing linearity, and a steady performance at its Investment Banking unit. A tall task in the current environment,” the report continued.

Meanwhile Citigroup is also forecasted to post an increase from a year ago, with earnings per share of $1.13 and revenue of $19.14 billion for the quarter. Citi posted a strong second quarter, with earnings soaring 42% in the second quarter, reaching $4.2 billion, or $1.34 per share.

How will the housing market with fare over the rest of 2014? According to Fannie Mae, it is predicted to pick up steam.

“Recent housing activity isn’t quite as positive, having shown only lukewarm growth since a promising start to the third quarter, but our forecast is little changed from August,” said Fannie Mae chief economist Doug Duncan.

“Purchase mortgage applications have trended down over the past three months, despite the declining interest rate environment. We believe this suggests a residual conservatism on the part of consumers and supports our view that the pace of growth in the housing sector will be subdued during the remainder of 2014, with modest improvement in 2015.”