As the chief financial officer for Thrive, Michael Jones has been accountable for the administrative, financial and risk management operations of the company.

In 2019, for the third time in four years, Thrive Mortgage was named to the Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing privately owned companies in the U.S. Additionally, in late 2018, Thrive was an inductee into the Baylor University Institute for Family Business Hall of Fame. This award is given to a company who earns the university’s Texas Family Business of the Year honor for a third time. 

In addition to guiding and growing Thrive Mortgage, Jones is also a published author of “Reset: A Mortgage Novel” and numerous articles in various media outlets. His knowledge pertaining to secondary markets, financial relationships and managing the financial well-being of the company has led to countless opportunities to take part in advisory panels, councils and trade organizations. Jones has been invited to Washington, D.C. on several recent occasions to represent coalitions of mortgage lenders in meetings with the CFPB, Fannie Mae and members of the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

At a more regional level, Jones is continually invited to be a panelist and contributor to many local conferences and speaking engagements. He is highly involved in numerous trade organizations including Texas Home Builders Association, National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals and the Community Mortgage Lenders of America.

Jones recognizes tech trends in the industry and position Thrive Mortgage to provide innovative products and services that enhance the borrower experience.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

“The best advice I’ve ever received is, first, ‘Never be afraid to fail.’ The second best is, ‘Don’t let your ego keep you from saying, ‘I don’t know.’”

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