Items Tagged with 'chairman of the index committee'

ARTICLES

  • Home Prices Slip a Record 19.1%

    Following a trend that began in late 2007 and prevailed throughout 2008, US home prices continued to fall at a record pace over the first quarter of this year, dampening hopes the housing slump is nearing an end. The S&P/Case-Shiller US National Home Price Index recorded a 19.1% decline in Q109 compared to Q108, marking the largest decline in the series' 21-year history. "We see no evidence that a recovery in home prices has begun," said David Blitzer, chairman of the index committee for Standard & Poor's.
    Read More
  • Home Prices Fall, but is Stabilization Near?

    Home prices in major metropolitan areas continued to fall in February; however, for the first time in 16 months, the annual decline did not set a new record, possibly suggesting early signs of market stabilization. The S&P/Case-Shiller 10-City and 20-City Home Price Indices released Tuesday recorded nationwide, annual declines of 18.8% and 18.6%, respectively. This is a slight improvement from the returns reported for January, which fell by 19.4% and 19.0%.
    Read More
  • Home Prices Fall Record 19.4 Percent in January: Report

    Home prices in major metropolitan areas fell at a record pace during January, underscoring a housing market in many key areas of the U.S. that is still stuck in 'price correction' mode. According to the widely-watched Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller home price indices, prices fell 19.4 percent in 10 key cities during Janaury versus one year earlier, while a 20-city index fell 19.0 percent. Both represent record annual price declines, S&P said in a press statement.
    Read More
  • Home Values Down 18.2 Percent: Report

    Home values continued to decline in all 20 metro areas of The Case-Shiller 20-city home price index in the 12 months ending in November, with 11 of the 20 areas posting record rates of annual decline, Standard & Poor's reported Tuesday. The 20-City Composite Index as a whole fell 2.2 percent from October to November -- with home values in all 20 cities falling at least one percent -- and a record-setting 18.2 percent for the year ending November.
    Read More
  • Report: U.S. Home Values Decline 18% Annually

    Continued pressure on an already troubled market caused annual price declines recorded in October to surpass the previous month's data, according to a statement released Tuesday by Standard & Poor's. According to the S&P/Case-Shiller home prices indices through October 2008, the 10-city index composite registered an annual decline of 19.1 percent, accelerated from the 17.4 percent reported for September. Prices across the 20-city composite also fell, averaging an 18 percent decline nationwide.
    Read More
  • Home Prices Tank During September

    The nation's real estate correction gained momentum during September, with economic turmoil placing pressure on an already battered housing market to push prices down at a record pace during the month. According to the S&P/Case-Shiller home prices indices, released Tuesday morning, prices in 20 key metropolitan areas fell 18.6 percent during Sept., while a 10-city composite index registered an annual decline of 17.4 percent.
    Read More
  • Home Prices Fall Record 16.6 Percent in August: Case-Shiller

    Prices in key housing markets nationwide continued to tumble during August, a key report said on Tuesday morning. The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller home price indices posted their umpteenth record annual decline in August, with a 10-city index falling 17.7 percent and a 20-city index falling 16.6 percent, S&P said in a press statement. Prices fell roughly 1 percent across all 20 cities between July and August, according to the index data. "The downturn in residential real estate prices continued, with very few bright spots in the data," says
    Read More
  • Housing Prices Post Record Decline in Q2

    In a nutshell, U.S. home prices in general are still falling at an astronomical rate, but some areas have seen the rate of decrease moderate in recent months -- an effect that may be seasonality, may be the start of more sustained price declines (compared to accelerated price declines), or may reflect purchase activity at the lower price points and among deeply-discounted foreclosure properties now flooding many key local housing markets.
    Read More