Items Tagged with 'David Kittle'

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  • Former MBA Chairman David Kittle joins ComplianceEase

    Will be SVP of government and industry relations
    ComplianceEase hired former MBA chairman David Kittle as its senior vice president of government and industry relations. He brings years of experience managing relationships with Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Federal Home Loan Banks, Ginnie Mae and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
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  • The Mortgage Collaborative names new board members, CEO

    David Kittle, Debra Still and Jim Park to serve in leadership roles
    The Mortgage Collaborative announced several changes to its board of directors and executive management team. After the changes, David Kittle will serve as vice chairman of the board, Debra Still will serve as secretary of board and Jim Park will serve as the Mortgage Collaborative’s chief executive officer.
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  • Industry Calls For Resources to Support FHA Growth

    Industry groups and even a government watchdog on the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) appeared Thursday before a House Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, calling for more resources to prop up a HUD program's growing presence in the residential mortgage market.
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  • Bill Calls for $15,000 Any-Time Home Buyer Credit

    The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) on Monday declared its support for a Senate bill, S 1230 or the Homebuyer Tax Credit Act of 2009, which expands the current first-time home buyer tax credit from $8,000 to $15,000. The bill also makes the tax credit available to anyone who purchases a principal residence in the year following the enactment of the bill. The MBA is already calling for monetization of the credit at the closing table on the grounds that more consumers will become home buyers if they don't have to struggle to put away a substantial down payment.
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  • House Committee Gives Go Ahead on Mortgage Reform

    The House Financial Services Committee approved legislation today that may potentially bring sweeping changes to the way the mortgage industry conducts business. HR1728 or the Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act, aims to curb forms of lending that have been a major factor in the highest home foreclosure rate in the nation in 25 years, the committee said in a statement.
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  • House Readies the Red Pen for Mortgage Reform

    The House Financial Services Committee plans to meet Tuesday to consider legislation that may bring sweeping changes to the way the mortgage industry conducts business. The bill in question, called HR1728 or the Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act, aims to curb forms of lending that have been a major factor in the highest home foreclosure rate in the nation in 25 years the committee said in a statement.
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  • Mortgage Reform Bill May Kill Competition

    In testimony today before the House Financial Services Committee the chairman of Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), David Kittle, says the risk retention provision currently drafted in Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act of 2009 (HR1728) would make it impossible for many lenders to compete, among other faults.
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  • Government Share of Mortgage Apps Soars: Report

    The latest proof of the government's growing influence in the mortgage banking sector came Tuesday morning from the Mortgage Bankers Association, which said that of all mortgage applications taken during the month of October, 32.9 percent were for government-insured loans -- primarily borrowers looking to apply for an FHA-eligible loan, although VA loans are included in the total as well -- compared to 10.3 percent one year ago.
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  • Viewpoint: The Battle for Mortgage Banking

    House Financial Services Committee chairman Barney Frank (D-MA) held a hearing last Friday that "examined the role of mortgage servicing in the foreclosure crisis, focusing specifically on ongoing problems with loan modifications and the need for improvements in servicing practices and responsiveness to consumers." At least, that was the published party line. Closer to reality, however, the hearing marked a dramatic shift in the debate over the housing mess -- a shift that may well determine what mortgage banking will look like over the next 20 to 30 years.
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