Items Tagged with 'National Housing Conference'

ARTICLES

  • Housing finance reform’s gridlock problem: Affordable housing

    What is standing in the way of reform?
    [Expert commentary] Housing finance reform remains the single largest piece of unfinished business of the housing crisis. And the single biggest factor standing in the way of that business is getting agreement on how to ensure that the GSEs serve all Americans, not just the wealthy.
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  • Housing finance reform should fix what’s broken

    What does housing finance reform look like?
    [Expert commentary] Nearly 10 years after Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were placed into conservatorship, housing finance reform remains the single largest piece of unfinished business of the housing crisis. The failure of Fannie and Freddie, the taxpayer bailout and repayment that followed, and their unresolved conservatorship continue to demand final resolution, even if Congress does not.
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  • Former Treasury official David Dworkin joins National Housing Conference as CEO

    Most recently served as a senior housing policy advisor at Treasury
    The National Housing Conference, a nonprofit fair housing advocate, announced this week it hired David Dworkin to serve as the organization’s new president and CEO. Dworkin comes to NHC from the Department of the Treasury, where he most recently served as a senior housing policy advisor in the Office of Domestic Finance.
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  • Message from housing finance groups: Congress must work on GSE reform

    Groups send joint letter to Mnuchin and Watt
    Initial talks from the Trump administration on reforming Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are not happening as quickly as originally anticipated due to a growing backlog of things to accomplish in Washington D.C. Despite the slowed-down timeline, some of the biggest housing finance groups joined together to remind housing officials to stay focused on reform.
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  • Housing industry welcomes Senate confirmation of Pam Patenaude as HUD deputy secretary

    Industry continues to support Patenaude
    As was the case throughout the nomination process, the housing industry was quick to praise the Senate confirmation of Pam Patenaude to serve as the next deputy secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Patenaude was confirmed on Thursday in an 80-17 vote in the Senate, with all 17 no votes come from the Democratic side of the aisle. Patenaude’s confirmation received a warmer welcome within the housing industry.
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  • Affordable housing groups say Trump budget would be catastrophic

    Claim it takes policy in the wrong direction
    Affordable housing advocates are taking a stand against President Donald Trump’s budget proposal which includes cutting several HUD housing programs. While the Treasury and even HUD itself spoke out in favor of the new budget proposal, one affordable housing advocate insists the budget would be catastrophic.
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  • Housing industry praises Trump's selection of Pam Patenaude as HUD deputy secretary

    Support comes in from all sides
    For those in the housing industry, Pam Patenaude’s name is well known. So, it should come as no shock that the housing industry supports the Trump administration’s nomination of Patenaude to serve as the HUD deputy secretary. Declarations of support for Patenaude came in quickly after the White House’s announcement of her nomination, including from some of the housing industry’s biggest groups, and from Patenaude’s potential boss at HUD.
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  • Community lenders "baffled" to see major trade groups push "Wall Street" agenda

    CMLA pushes back against MBA, NAR efforts on GSE reform
    The battle lines surrounding the potential reform of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are becoming firmly drawn, with the Community Mortgage Lenders of America denouncing and rejecting a recent letter from several of the largest trade groups in housing that called for the Federal Housing Finance Agency to leave Fannie and Freddie reform to Congress.
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