Items Tagged with 'conforming loan limits'

ARTICLES

  • FHFA increases conforming loan limits for 2nd straight year

    Hikes Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac 2018 loan limits to match rising home prices
    Last year, the Federal Housing Finance Agency increased the maximum conforming loan limits for mortgages to be acquired by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for the first time since the housing crisis. And now, the FHFA is doing it again.
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  • Is it now time to finally raise conforming loan limits?

    Market can handle a $12,000 lift
    The chances that the Federal Housing Finance Agency will raise the maximum conforming loan limits for mortgages to be acquired by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2017 is high now after meeting one certain condition. This would be a very positive change for the industry and borrowers, according to one industry expert. The industry will know for sure come November.
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  • FHA announces 2016 loan limits

    Limits will increase in 188 counties
    The Federal Housing Administration announced its loan limits for 2016, with the loan limits in 188 counties set to increase due to changes in housing prices. Click here to learn more about where the FHA raised its loan limits for 2016.
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  • FHFA announces 2016 conforming loan limits

    Much of U.S. left unchanged; limits increase in 39 ‘high-cost’ counties
    The Federal Housing Finance Agency announced the maximum conforming loan limits for mortgages to be acquired by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2016. Despite some predictions that the loan limits would rise for 2016, the FHFA said the conforming loan limits will remain unchanged for much of the country, but not everywhere.
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  • NAFCU urges the FHFA to leave the conforming loan limit alone

    Housing still “vulnerable to any drastic market changes”
    The National Association of Federal Credit Unions is urging the Federal Housing Finance Agency to keep the conforming loan limit at its current level and not drop it below the current baseline rate of $417,000 because the market isn't strong enough yet. What do you think?
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