Items Tagged with 'GSE reform'

ARTICLES

  • Housing industry rallies around Trump’s GSE reform plan

    Experts weigh in on the effect and timing of the plan
    Today marks the 11th anniversary of the government takeover of the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Now, the housing industry is rallying behind the administration’s new secondary market reform plan that would remove the GSEs from conservatorship.
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  • From HW Magazine

    Mark Calabria: New director changes course for FHFA

    Exclusive sit down with new director on future of FHFA
    President Donald Trump appointed Calabria to take the helm of the FHFA on December 12, 2018. The Senate then officially confirmed Calabria in April by a vote of 52 to 44 as head of the agency. Since then, Calabria has not been silent on his plan to reform the FHFA and the entities it oversees – Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
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  • Fannie Mae adds former FDIC Chair Sheila Bair to board of directors

    Led federal banking regulator during financial crisis
    With the company seemingly moving closer to being returned to its pre-crisis state as a private company, Fannie Mae is bringing on some serious banking experience to help guide the GSE’s future. Fannie Mae announced Wednesday that Sheila Bair, the chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. during the financial crisis, is joining the GSE’s board of directors.
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  • Fitch: GSE reform won't hurt Fannie, Freddie ratings

    Ratings will remain intact, at least in the near term
    With word circulating that a plan for GSE reform is imminent, Fitch Ratings Agency released a review of what might happen to the credit ratings of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac upon the release of the Treasury Department’s anticipated roadmap. The good news for those gunning for an end to the conservatorship? Fannie and Freddie’s ratings shouldn’t take too much of a hit – at least, not right away, according to Fitch.
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  • Urban Institute: Launch of FHFA's single security was "flawless"

    Says uniform security lays important groundwork for GSE reform
    In June, the Federal Housing Finance Agency announced that its long-laid plans to launch a single security – the Uniform MBS – for loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac had finally come to fruition. Now, with two months of UMBS in play, the Urban Institute is praising the successful launch of this “enormous undertaking,” noting the critical groundwork it lays for future GSE reform.
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  • Former Freddie Mac CEO Donald Layton: Trump's Treasury says GSE reform has "mostly happened"

    Layton reveals conversation with unnamed senior Treasury official
    Donald Layton, who stepped down as the CEO of Freddie Mac a month ago, is providing some insight into the Trump administration’s view on GSE reform from his new perch at Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. Layton reveals a conversation he had in a meeting with an unnamed senior official in the U.S. Treasury who told him: “GSE reform has already mostly happened.”
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  • Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac still in conservatorship in 2024? Calabria says it’s possible

    Tells Reuters that he hopes to have GSEs out of conservatorship by 2024
    Recent reporting by Bloomberg suggested that the Trump administration may be wavering on pursuing widespread reforms of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in advance of the 2020 election due to the potential economic impact of those reforms on voters. Now, Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Mark Calabria now says it’s possible that the GSEs may remain in conservatorship until 2024, at least.
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  • Former Freddie Mac CEO says GSEs should be regulated like utilities

    Layton says Fannie and Freddie were "lazy competitors" before government seizure
    Two weeks into his new gig as a senior fellow at Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies, Donald Layton, who was the CEO of Freddie Mac until the end of June, is speaking out – in favor of utility-style regulation of the GSEs. He also states the mortgage giants were “lazy competitors” before the 2008 government seizure.
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