Joseph Mason

Joseph Mason

Joseph R. Mason is the Moyse/LBA Chair of Banking at the Ourso School of Business at Louisiana State University and a Senior Fellow at the Wharton School.

Dr. Mason’s consulting practice provides firms with advice on financial, political, and legal risks in banking and finance. He has consulted on issues ranging from mortgage, home equity loan, home equity line of credit, auto, and credit card servicing, and securitization, to discrimination and disparate impact in consumer lending and insurance pricing, valuing distressed securities, the investor recoveries and efficient liquidations of bankrupt firms, and economic valuations of complex investment and lending arrangements involving asset-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations, and hedge funds.

ARTICLES

  • The Obama administration’s regulatory capture

    As an economist, I know one simple truth: every legislative and regulatory decision has implications for jobs and output. Hence, policies like mandating mortgage modifications and forgoing access to energy resources in the Outer Continental Shelf and the Gulf of Mexico have inextricable economic consequences.
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  • Mortgage modification push is losing steam

    With all the flurry surrounding the recently announced preliminary settlement conditions sought by attorneys general and bank regulators after the foreclosure crisis, it is interesting to note that the modification push that is the focus of that effort is losing ground in Congress.
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  • Robo-signer technicalities only a portion of mortgage industry's problems

    The press has had a field day with foreclosure difficulties and robosigners in the last couple of weeks. In reality, such problems pale in comparison with the difficulties already existing in the industry. For the past year or more, mortgage servicers have struggled with selling properties taken back in foreclosures. Such disposition delays have cost the industry dearly, and will continue to do so. In response, some in the industry delayed foreclosures. Some banks allowed greater time for borrowers to affect short sales. Others took more time to modify loans, hoping to avoid foreclosure.
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  • Why Basel III is not enough

    Now that summer is over and I have recovered from the shock of Dodd-Frank, we have Basel III on the horizon. Basel III moves in some predictable directions, but -- focusing exclusively on capital – still falls short of meaningful reform that addresses the propensity for future crises.
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  • Bank Failures and Losses Ahead in 2010

    After a hopeful holiday we are coming back to reality. Jobless numbers were up again, firms continue to economize on inventory, and while holiday retail sales at discounters rose, high-end stores either slowed or rose slightly from extremely low sales last year. Moreover, on Friday, January 8, bank failures resumed.
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