Mortgage rates continue to tumble, according to Freddie Mac, with the average 30-year fixed rate reaching another record low of 4.42%. There is no consensus this week on rates, as another index reports the 30-year fixed rate climbed. Freddie Mac said the average 15-year adjustable-rate mortgage for the week ended today remained flat with the prior week at 3.9%. Both rates have now declined for nine straight weeks and are at the nadir. The GSE began publishing 30-year fixed-mortgage averages in 1971 and added the ARM data to its weekly primary mortgage market survey 1991. Freddie Mac deputy chief economist Amy Crews Cutts said "investors in long-term bonds appear very confident that inflation will remain in check, and as a result long-term fixed mortgage rates have continued to fall." "The 12-month growth in the core consumer price index has held at only 0.9 percent for four straight months ending in July," Crews Cutts said. "The last time price growth was this low was the year ending January 1966." She also said construction of single-family homes fell for the third-straight month in July to 432,000 homes, which is the lowest since May 2009. Meanwhile, the most-recent Bankrate survey of large banks and thrifts showed the 30-year fixed mortgage rate climbing to 4.63% from 4.57% a week ago. The firm’s data pegged the 15-year fixed rate at 4.11% up 5 bps from the prior week, and the average five-year adjustable-rate mortgage of 3.95% was up 3 bps from 3.92% last week. With rates at record lows, refinancings are way up and accounted for more than 80% of all mortgages written last week. Write to Jason Philyaw.