Fannie Mae (FNM) reported Tuesday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it expects the Federal Housing Finance Agency, acting as conservator of Fannie Mae, to soon request funds from the Treasury Department under the $100 billion senior preferred stock purchase agreement. Under the agreement, active as of September, the Treasury is required to provide funds whenever the GSEs report a negative net worth. The request is based on preliminary unaudited information concerning Fannie Mae's fourth quarter and year-end results, according to the press release issued Tuesday. Management currently estimates that the amount of the draw will be somewhere between $11 billion and $16 billion. Although, the actual amount of the draw could differ significantly from this estimate, the statement said, because Fannie Mae is still preparing and finalizing its financial statements. The estimated draw expected to be requested reflects management's current estimate of the effect that the company's anticipated net loss -- primarily as a result of credit expenses and fair value losses during the fourth quarter of 2008 -- as well as other items, would have on Fannie Mae's net worth as of fourth-quarter's end. The Federal Housing Finance Agency has not previously requested any funds on behalf of Fannie Mae under the Purchase Agreement, and as of the current date, Fannie Mae has not received any cash proceeds from the Treasury, unlike government-sponsored entity Freddie Mac. Freddie Mac (FRE) on Friday filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission acknowledging the Federal Housing Finance Agency, acting as Freddie’s conservator, will request a second round of aid -- in the amount of $30 to $35 billion -- from the Treasury under the $100 billion purchasing program. Freddie drew $13.8 billion under the agreement when it reported weak third-quarter results in November, suggesting a trend of increasingly great financial need. Write to Kelly Curran at Disclosure: The author held no relevant investment positions when this story was published. Indirect holdings may exist via mutual fund investments. HW reporters and writers follow a strict disclosure policy, the first in the mortgage trade.