When New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman sued Bank of New York Mellon in August, the AG asserted that the Countrywide mortgage-backed securitization trustee had breached its duty to MBS investors. "As trustee, BNYM owed and owes a fiduciary duty of undivided loyalty," said the AG's suit, which was filed as a counterclaim in BNY Mellon's case seeking approval of the proposed $8.5 billion Bank of America settlement with MBS investors. "[BNYM] breached that duty to [investors'] detriment and disadvantage, by failing to notify them of issues regarding the quality of loans underlying their securities." But according to BNY Mellon, it had no such duty. The bank's lawyers at Mayer Brown and Dechert filed a 14-page brief this week outlining its interpretation of the responsibilities of an MBS securitization trustee. The filing came at the direction of Manhattan federal Judge William Pauley, who's deciding whether the BofA MBS settlement should be heard in state court, where BNY Mellon filed it, or in federal court, where key objectors to the proposed settlement want it to proceed.