An Insider’s Look Into How Secondary Marketing Evaluates LOs

In this webinar we’ll explore the long-term financial impacts of renegotiations, extensions and fallouts, plus basic guidelines to be viewed as a professional by your secondary marketing department

HousingWire Annual Virtual Summit

Sessions from HousingWire Annual 2021 are going to be virtually streamed on October 25. Register now for FREE to tune into what housing industry leaders had to say this year!

How Freddie Mac is addressing affordable housing challenges

Freddie Mac is focused on addressing limited access to credit, housing inequalities, creation and preservation of affordable housing supply and advancement of homeownership education.

A NAR board member tells (almost) all

For this week’s Houses in Motion, a miniseries that is part of HousingWire Daily, we spoke with Lisa Dunn about the pressing issues in real estate, including disclosure of agent commission.

Politics & MoneyMortgage

Another $15K first-time homebuyer tax credit bill emerges

Fair housing advocates argue that a tax credit will not increase minority homeownership and that a direct cash subsidy would be more effective

Questioning First-time homebuyer tax credits

The much-talked-about $15,000 first-time homebuyer tax credit has made another appearance in Washington, D.C., this time as part of a housing bill introduced in the U.S. Senate. Though certain provisions of the bill contain some of the boldest proposed housing policy changes on record, affordable housing advocates say there’s one critical shortcoming.

The latest iteration, proposed by Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR), is nearly identical to a bill introduced in the House of Representatives earlier in the year. But there are some important changes within Wyden’s version, which is dubbed the “Decent, Affordable, Safe Housing for All (DASH) Act.”

Wyden’s bill would allow a borrower to use the tax credit for up to 20% of the purchase price, whereas the House’s version allows up to just 10%. The change is focused on helping low-to-middle income earners, but the definition of who qualifies as a first-time homebuyer has also notably been tweaked.

In Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Rep. Jimmy Panetta’s (D-CA) House bill, a first-time homebuyer is defined as someone who has “no present ownership interest in any residence during the three-year period ending on the date of the purchase of the residence.”

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