JPMorgan Chase (JPM) so far has provided $2,245,673,500 in consumer relief credit to 111,924 borrowers through Sept. 30, 2014 as part of its $13 billion agreement to settle claims regarding the packaging, marketing, sale and issuance of residential mortgage-backed securities by Chase, Bear Stearns and Washington Mutual to investors before the financial crisis.

Joseph Smith, as monitor of the settlement, released his initial report overseeing Chase as it distributes $4 billion in credited consumer relief. Chase must provide the $4 billion in credited relief by Dec. 31, 2017.

"We continue to help thousands of families become homeowners and assist those who may be struggling. Over the last year, we have helped more than 151,000 families through nearly $19 billion in total mortgage relief," said Jason Lobo a spokesperson for JPMorgan.

The report also contained Chase’s self-reported gross consumer relief, which the monitor has not yet validated. According to Chase, in the fourth quarter 2014, it provided $5.1 billion in principal forgiveness and forbearance, rate reduction and low-to-moderate or disaster area lending to 39,512 borrowers.

Chase also asserted that as of Dec. 31, 2014, 151,436 borrowers had received some type of relief, including $1,956,638,212 in principal forgiveness or forbearance, $1,115,656,744 in rate reduction, and $15,771,381,912 in eligible lending.

“After in-depth formula testing and data review, I have credited Chase with more than half of the $4 billion in consumer relief credit it must provide under this agreement.” Smith said. “I look forward to reporting on my next round of testing mid-year. In its consumer relief requirements, I addition to its progress toward have no reason to believe that Chase has failed to comply with any of the policy-based, non-creditable requirements of the Settlement.”

New York Attorney General Eric Shneiderman, who co-chairs a working group overseeing legacy mortgage investigations, announced the deal back in November, calling it the largest settlement with a single entity in American history.

As part of the final agreement, JPMorgan will pay $9 billion, along with the $4 billion in consumer relief.

New York state alone will receive $1 billion from the settlement, including $613 million in cash and another $400 million in consumer relief for struggling borrowers in the state.