7. Cincinnati, Ohio

It is no surprise that Cincinnati is on the list, especially since in 2012 it became the largest city in the U.S. to provide 100% renewable electricity to its residents and continues to use green energy today. On top of this, Cincinnati has 70 neighborhood parks, 34 nature preserves, and one of the largest public plant conservatories. This data accrued to a final score of 52.93, a median air quality of 54, 10.9 parks per 10,000 residents and 18 gallons of excess fuel consumed per commuter.

6. Buffalo, N.Y.

There are more than 180 parks and recreational facilities in Buffalo, giving it the nickname the “City of Trees.” Currently, the city’s land use and zoning policies are in the midst of a historic revision under a process called the “Green Code,” which will guide the city’s development over the next 20 year and aims to improve the environment and create a more sustainable community. For now, the city boasts a final score of 53.33, a median air quality of 41, 7.7 parks per 10,000 residents and 18 gallons of excess fuel consumed per commuter. Meanwhile, 32.6% of the population works from home, walks, carpools, bikes or takes public transit to work.

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5. Greensboro, N.C.

In order to place fifth on the list, Greensboro’s local government created land use policies to protect open spaces and installed a variety of energy-efficient equipment and appliances. The city recorded a final score of 53.72, a median air quality of 38, 6.9 parks per 10,000 residents and 12 gallons of excess fuel consumed per commuter.

4. Rochester, N.Y.

The city started the Project Green plan to enhance its residents' quality of life by converting a great deal of city space into green infrastructure such as gardens, parks and renewable-energy generating facilities. The city posted a final score of 57.33, a median air quality of 36, 7.2 parks per 10,000 residents and 13 gallons of excess fuel consumed per commuter.