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Staten Island 'haunted' house on sales block

April 5, 2012
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If you are in the market for a haunted house, this Staten Island beauty is for you. It has both myth and reality to back up its deathly street cred, and it’s on a road that has “kill” in the name. What more could you want?

The home, at 4500 Arthur Kill Road, was once owned by the Kreischer family, which operated a brick factory that supplied most of the bricks in the area during the 1800s. With their money, they built two homes: One for the original family (the home for sale) and one for their son and his bride.

Later, a feud exploded between the father and the son, and it never reconciled. Soon after, the son's home suspiciously burned down killing both the son and his wife. The original home is said to be haunted by the son and his bride, with apparitions, doors slamming on their own and the obligatory mysterious banging sounds.

But in 2005, the home was the scene of something even more grizzly. Joseph (Joe Black) Young, was paid $8,000 by the Bonnano crime family to murder Robert McKelvey. Then, in the home, he sawed his body into pieces before throwing them into the furnace to dispose of the evidence. He was convicted of racketeering and murder in late 2008.

But now the home, which features five bedrooms and five bathrooms and sits on 1 acre of land, is up for sale at just under $1.6 million. If you believe TopTenRealEstateDeals.com, “all evidence of its murky past has been stripped away and the original grandeur has been restored.”

The home is zoned for multiple uses, and the listing on Trulia proposes a variety of uses, including a spa, restaurant, bed and breakfast, or rehabilitation center, among others.

While I’m not sure a relaxing spa would work in a home where a man was sawed to pieces and burned, the home could become one heck of a haunted bed and breakfast.

jhuseman@housingwire.com
@JessicaHuseman 

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