The devil is in the mortgage finance reform details

The devil is in the mortgage finance reform details

On the bumpy road to a common securitization platform

Housing shouldn’t look at any color but the color of money

People with bad credit and bad habits should be squeezed out of housing

Who is Nat Hardwick?

Former LandCastle Title CEO owns NASCAR team, rubs elbows with PGA pros
W S

REwired

new REwired blog header
Opinion, commentary and analysis on everything that makes the U.S. housing economy tick -- not to mention the ghosts in the machine, too. Written by HW's team of editors and reporters each business day.
Investments

Guess who the biggest investors in Fannie, Freddie are?

February 22, 2013

From the desk of FTN Financial "who owns what" data base, the company revealed the biggest buyers of term fixed-income securities, including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac bonds, during the last five years.

And the winner is — drum roll, please — households and taxpayers investing via mutual funds and the Federal Reserve.

Coming in a close second were overseas governments and central banks — no surprise there. 

Additionally, despite the Federal Reserve purchasing a large percentage of new mortgage originations since 2009, domestic portfolios have concentrated in mortgages and corporates. 

In regards to volume, these two asset classes could easily be the first on "the firing line" rather than Treasuries, FTN suggested.

"The Fed believes it has erected a firewall against a raging bear market by holding onto a sizeable portfolio of Treasuries and mortgages. The swing vote will be households and overseas investors that look at their fixed-income portfolios as an adjunct to their overall financial goals rather than strictly as assets to be maximized," FTN Financial wrote.

cmlynski@housingwire.com

Comments powered by Disqus