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Mortgage visionary uses Twitter to announce resignation from Zillow and Mortech

Could this be a first for the mortgage business?

June 3, 2014
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Mortgage entrepreneur and tech visionary Don Kracl just used Twitter to resign from his position at Mortech and Zillow (Z).

Kracl spent the last three decades searching for ways to make mortgage lending easier not just for borrowers, but for the housing finance industry as well.

Kracl is the founder of Mortech, a business providing mortgage technology software solutions for mortgage bankers and secondary market teams, later purchased in November 2012 by Zillow.

Early this year, Mortech, now a Zillow business, was recognized by HousingWire Magazine as one of the 100 most innovative technology companies serving the U.S. housing industry.

In the most recent issue of HousingWire magazine, Kracl penned a commentary, ironically recalling the terribly inefficient "good old days."

"I realized those good old days weren't really all that great," Kracl writes, recalling countless forms and broken pencils.

He continues to lambast the dinosaurs of mortgage lending for not getting up to speed on social media. (For what's its worth, in the very same issue HousingWire outlines the varying social media strategies utilized by mortgage lenders and servicers.)

"It's time we all realize that we're in the communication business," Kracl writes.

"If you don't have a Twitter account, get one," he advises. "Post your rates on Twitter. Get some followers. Start following others. Let people know you are in the mortgage business."

And, when the time is right, you can even use Twitter as a notification that your life is now moving in a new direction:

 

 

 

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