This is why Fannie and Freddie mortgage initiatives won't work

This is why Fannie and Freddie mortgage initiatives won't work

MBA declarations are feel-good, but temporary

How far can lenders push the credit box?

Watt announcement helps, but risk keeps standards tight

Warren calls for GAO investigation of nonbank servicers

Asks GAO to review “unprecedented” growth of nonbank servicers
W S

REwired

new REwired blog header
Opinion, commentary and analysis on everything that makes the U.S. housing economy tick -- not to mention the ghosts in the machine, too. Written by HW's team of editors and reporters each business day.

5 exercises for mortgage professionals to keep in shape

Get ready for a stressful Spring buying season

March 10, 2014
/ Print / Reprints /
| Share More
/ Text Size+

Who's got your back? HousingWire has your back. The big news this morning is the stress from the looming Spring buying season.

Already, we've seen it called "critical" to the success of the housing recovery. Well, Spring starts in less than two weeks.

You'll need to get in shape to stay sharp.

So whether you’re a real estate agent driving around town, or a loan broker strapped to a desk, here are 5 exercises mortgage professionals need to keep in shape.

Besides, what's a better way to spend your predicted, more abundant spare time?

(Source: Harvard Medical School, HealthBeat newsletter)

1. Swimming

The buoyancy of the water supports your body and takes the strain off painful joints so you can move them more fluidly. “Swimming is good for individuals with arthritis because it’s less weight-bearing,” explains Dr. I-Min Lee, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. 

Research finds that swimming can improve your mental state and put you in a better mood. Swimming, like the other exercises also reduce the risk of chronic illnesses, the newsletter adds.
 

2. Tai Chi

Tai chi — a Chinese martial art that incorporates movement and relaxation — is good for both body and mind. In fact, it’s been called “meditation in motion.” Tai chi is made up of a series of graceful movements, one transitioning smoothly into the next. Because the classes are offered at various levels, tai chi is accessible, and valuable, for people of all ages and fitness levels. “It’s particularly good for older people because balance is an important component of fitness, and balance is something we lose as we get older,” Dr. Lee says.
 

3. Strength Training

If you believe that strength training is a macho, brawny activity, think again. Lifting light weights won’t bulk up your muscles, but it will keep them strong. “If you don’t use muscles, they will lose their strength over time,” Dr. Lee says.

Muscle also helps burn calories. “The more muscle you have, the more calories you burn, so it’s easier to maintain your weight,” says Dr. Lee. As an added benefit, strength training may improve memory!

HARVARD DISCLAIMER: Before starting a weight training program, be sure to learn the proper form. Start light with just one or two pounds. You should be able to lift the weights 10 times with ease. After a couple of weeks, increase that by a pound or two. If you can easily lift the weights through the entire range of motion more than 12 times, move up to slightly heavier weight. 
 

4. Walking

Walking is simple, yet powerful. It can help you stay trim, improve cholesterol levels, strengthen bones, keep blood pressure in check, lift your mood and lower your risk for a number of diseases (diabetes and heart disease, for example). A number of studies have shown that walking and other physical activities can improve memory and resist age-related memory loss.

All you need is a well-fitting and supportive pair of shoes. Start with walking for about 10-15 minutes at a time. Over time you can start to walk farther and faster until you’re walking for 30 to 60 minutes on most days of the week.
 

5. Kegel exercises

Turns out these core exercises aren't just for women! However, these exercises won’t help you look better, but they do something just as important — strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that support the bladder. Strong pelvic floor muscles can go a long way toward preventing incontinence. While many women are familiar with Kegels, these exercises can benefit men too.

To do a Kegel exercise correctly, squeeze and release the muscles you would use to stop urination or prevent you from passing gas. Alternate quick squeezes and releases with longer contractions that you hold for 10 seconds, and then release for 10 seconds. Work up to three sets of 10-15 Kegel exercises each day.

According to Harvard Medical School, it's not that difficult to be considered an "active" person. "Raking the yard counts as physical activity. So does ballroom dancing and playing with your kids or grandkids. As long as you’re doing some form of aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes a day, and you include two days of strength training a week, you can consider yourself an “active” person," the newsletter states.

So those are 5 solid exercises to get you, well, solid. So stay sharp and stay positive for a "critical" Spring season in the housing economy.