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Freddie Mac 30-year mortgages break 5%

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Rates on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages surged during the last week, hitting the highest level since April 2010. The average 30-year FRM jumped more than 20 basis points to 5.05%, according to Freddie Mac's Primary Mortgage Market Survey. That's up from a rate of 4.97% this time last year. Rates for all other types of mortgages also soared compared to one week prior. Rates on 15-year FRMs are up to 4.29% from 4.08%. The average origination point for this type of loan is currently 0.7. The rate for a 15-year FRM was 4.34% one year ago. According to Freddie Mac, five-year, Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages increased significantly to 3.92% from 3.69% one week ago, while one-year, Treasury-indexed ARMs rose to 3.35%. During the same week in 2010, the rates for these ARMs were 4.19% and 4.33%, respectively. Freddie Mac Chief Economist Frank Nothaft said macroeconomic factors including unemployment are driving the upward trend in mortgage rates. "For all 2010, nonfarm productivity rose 3.6%, the most since 2002, while January's unemployment rate unexpectedly fell from 9.4% to 9%. Moreover, the service industry expanded in January at the fastest pace since August 2005," Nothaft said. "As a result, interest rates on a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage rose to the highest point since the last week in April." The Bankrate survey of large thrifts showed rate increases across the board. The rate for a 30-year FRM increased five basis points to 5.23%, the rate for 15-year FRMs rose slightly to 4.48%, and the rate for a 5-year ARM was unchanged at 4.01%. Write to Christine Ricciardi. Follow her on Twitter @HWnewbieCR.

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