Wilbur Ross quits Ocwen Financial

Wilbur Ross quits Ocwen Financial

Distressed asset investor bringing his magic to Bank of Cyprus

Dustin Johnson levels blockbuster claims at title attorneys

Is Nat Hardwick the fall guy?

CFPB proposes 7 big changes to foreclosure process for mortgage servicers

Adds guidance on extended borrower protections
W S

Both parties play the Wall Street card, sometimes from bottom of the deck

/ Print / Reprints /
| Share More
/ Text Size+
Anger at the financial services industry has been so high this election cycle that a viewer of campaign advertisements might be forgiven for thinking that Wall Street itself was on the ballot. As campaigning draws to a close, a review of scores of recent ads suggests that the anti-Wall Street messages have frequently used a loose interpretation of the facts. Outrage over the Wall Street bailout has been a prevailing theme, even though it was passed at the urging of President George W. Bush, has been credited by most economists with averting a financial collapse, and is expected to ultimately cost taxpayers a tiny fraction of the original $700 billion authorized by Congress. Contributions from the financial services industry have also been a target of criticism, even though both parties rely heavily on Wall Street for donations. And few candidates in either party are mentioning the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul signed into law by President Obama in July — with almost no Republican support — perhaps because of its complexity.

Recent Articles by Jason Philyaw

Comments powered by Disqus