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Architect plans to 3D-print the first two-story house

Solution to affordable housing shortage?

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Minnesota-based Andrey Rudenko completed the world’s first 3D-printed, large-scale model of a castle. Now he aspires to construct a two-story house with his self-designed printer (images below).

Similar attempts at affordable, quick housing have already been made. In Amsterdam, the  3D Canal House project is currently underway, and in April a Chinese company built 10 3D houses in a 24-hour period. Students at UCLA and Huddersfield University in the U.K. have developed small dome-shaped homes intended for millennials who cannot afford a mortgage, and houses built with large Legos have even been suggested.

However, there has been some criticism about these previous and current attempts. The houses don't always look appealing and most of them are just the outer shells, lacking the wiring, plumbing, furniture, interior walls and any other essentials that complete a house.

With a background in engineering, architecture and contracting, Rudenko intends to focus on more than just four walls and a roof. His plan is to build a complete, well-insulated home that includes certain furniture (kitchen counters, etc.), interior walls, fireplaces, and even the wiring and plumbing.

“This is why I’m currently conducting a large scale of experiments to extend the possibilities of this new technology – printing different elements, structures, and studying and developing new techniques,” Rudenko said in an interview with 3DPrint.com.

According to counterculture news source Motherboard, he remains confident that the construction will be without error, the only defects being caused by stopping and starting the printer.

While his plan is intriguing and in step with the advancement of 3D-printing technology, it's not without its challenges. He must find investors and obtain the necessary building permits. Furthermore, the house must meet certain code requirements.

If his plan succeeds, and the house proves true, Rudenko will implement his plan to construct energy-saving houses and sell DIY kits for his printer.

(Photo source: 3DPrint.com)

3D castle3D castle

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