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WSJ's Lewis: Fed's corrupt policies cost savers hundreds of billions

Federal Reserve Building
KEYWORDS Federal Reserve / Rates / WSJ / ZIRP
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Al Lewis doesn’t mince words over at MarketWatch, charging that the Federal Reserve’s zero interest rate policy is costing savers hundreds of billions, and the trade off in helping provide a safety net for real estate and banks isn’t worth it.

Our financial system is so corrupt you might say that a fish rots from the Fed.

How else can one describe a regime that punishes savers and rewards borrowers and speculators for years on end? Our central bank is essentially taking billions of dollars a year from average Americans, who are still struggling to get by in a bombed-out economy, and it is giving it — yes, giving it — to the very banks that helped cause the 2008 financial crisis in the first place.

Richard Barrington, an analyst with Moneyrates.com, estimates the Fed’s policies have cost savers $757.9 billion since the crisis, in an analysis released Tuesday . That’s approaching $1 trillion, which used to be considered a lot of money, even to bankers, before the crisis. The Fed, meanwhile, has only given the world a little assurance that its policies will change at some point in the distant future.

“It’s a stealth bailout,” Barrington said. “Low-interest-rate policies have helped bail out banks, the stock market and real estate, but the Fed has not publicly acknowledged the cost of those policies.”

Of course, not. Because the costs are staggering.

Source: MarketWatch
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