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Congress may address debt ceiling after Labor Day

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Over the next three months, the Treasury will decrease coupon auctions sizes in two- and three- year notes due to the government’s improved fiscal outlook.

"On May 17, 2013, Treasury began employing extraordinary measures in order to finance the government until Congress authorizes an increase in the debt limit," explained Treasury Assistant Secretary for Financial Markets Matthew Rutherford.

He added, "Based on current projections of cash flows and extraordinary measures, it appears Treasury will have room to continue financing government operations so that Congress can address this when they return after Labor Day."

Nonetheless, the Treasury will keep the auction size the same next week, planning to borrow $72 billion in Treasury securities, according to its latest quarterly refunding announcement. 

The government is set to issue $32 billion in three-year notes, $24 billion in 10-year notes and $16 billion in 30-year bonds.

Additionally, the Treasury plans to hold its first floating rate auction in January 2014 and issued final rules on Wednesday.

"The FRN will complement our existing suite of securities and help Treasury achieve its objective of financing the government at the lowest cost over time," Rutherford said.

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